Life-Changing Events That Reduce Your Medicare Premium (Apr 27, 2020)

If you are what Social Security considers a “higher-income beneficiary,” you pay more for Medicare Part B, the health insurance portion of Medicare, and Part D, prescription drug coverage. The Social Security Administration (SSA) uses the most recent Federal tax return provided by the IRS to make this determination, but that might reflect your income from two years prior. If you have experienced a life-changing event that has caused an income decrease, you can request that Social Security revisit its decision.

 

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Age 66 – Full Retirement Age For Social Security (Jan 22, 2020)

You can claim Social Security retirement benefits as early as age 62. Many Americans do so, especially women [1]. However, claiming early means that your monthly benefit checks and, potentially, your overall lifetime payout amount, will be lower than if you wait until full retirement age for Social Security. Full Retirement Age is the age at which you become eligible to receive non-reduced benefits and, if you’re still working, are no longer subject to the earnings limit. In short, Full Retirement Age means full Social Security. 

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Age 62 – Early Social Security Retirement Benefits (Jan 22, 2020)

Age 62 is the earliest age at which you can start receiving Social Security retirement benefits. It’s also the most popular age to claim benefits [1], especially for women. Deciding whether to claim now or wait until Full Retirement Age is an important decision. Claiming early Social Security retirement benefits can make sense for some people. However, it permanently reduces your monthly payment amounts and can impact total lifetime benefits. Here’s what to consider before claiming early Social Security retirement benefits at age 62. 

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Top 10 Retirement Myths (Feb 27, 2018)

You’ve probably heard some retirement myths, or read them online. While quick-fix retirement myths can be tempting, it’s important to evaluate their accuracy relative to your personal finances. Furthermore, many retirement myths are decades old, when lifestyles and retirement were far different than today.

Whether you’re a Millennial just starting out, an individual at the height of your career, or you’ve already retired, it’s vital to make the most of your retirement savings. This begins with establishing a personalized retirement plan – and reconsidering the validity of the following retirement myths.

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Is Maxing Your 401(k) Enough? (Mar 6, 2017)

If you’re like most Americans, a 401(k) or similar retirement plan represents the bulk of your long-term savings. Every year, the IRS places limits on the annual contributions you can complete to these and other qualified retirement plans. Too often, people mistakenly think that if they’re contributing these maximum annual amounts, they’re saving as much as they need. While these limits might be acceptable for some individuals, they may not be adequate for everyone. The reality is that the amount you need to save for retirement hinges upon the following five key factors.

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Time Runs Out For Popular Social Security Strategies (Nov 6, 2015)

Dramatic changes were recently announced to Social Security benefit provisions.

The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015, signed into law on November 2nd, effectively eliminated the Restricted Application and the File-and-Suspend strategies. Those already utilizing these options will be grandfathered in; some will have a short six-month window in which to act; and, others need to be aware of how future benefits will be more limited. The media has focused on how the termination of these unintended, but popular, strategies will impact married couples. The truth is that the changes will impact single individuals as well. If your retirement plan included anticipated Social Security benefits, please take the time to read more.

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Social Security and Medicare – Looking Ahead (Jul 26, 2012)

The outlook for Social Security and Medicare are of growing importance for our economy.

The first baby boomers became eligible for Social Security in 2008 (at age 62) and for Medicare just last year. Costs of these programs currently represent approximately 8.7% of GDP and 56% of IRS tax receipts. By 2033, those figures are projected to climb to 12.5% of GDP and 81% of current tax receipts.

The following Barron’s reprint discusses a number of considerations, including how long-term impacts could affect your future benefits.

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The Transition Into Retirement (Feb 24, 2012)

Are you ready to retire? The question is actually more complicated than it first appears, because it demands consideration on two levels. First, there’s the emotional component: Are you ready to enter a new phase of life? Do you have a plan for what you would like to accomplish or do in retirement? Have you thought through both the good and bad aspects of transitioning into retirement? Second, there’s the financial component: Can you afford to retire? Will your finances support the retirement lifestyle that you want? Do you have a retirement income plan in place?

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